Trend Spotting: Crushed-Foil Metallics

Metallics are not new in fashion. In the 1930s, lamé was commonly used for evening gowns and contributed to “Old Hollywood Glamour.” During the 80s, when people wanted non-natural colors to incorporate into their wardrobes, metallics were widely accepted, but then unfortunately labeled as “tacky.” There was a brief resurgence in the 90s, but the SS14 season brought a big display of shimmer to the runways. Christopher Kane, Haider Ackmann, 3.1 Phillip Lim, Givenchy, Tom Ford, and Altuzarra were among the brands embracing shine. Now, anything that shines equals glamour. The FW16 season felt a push for metallics and it continued in the SS17 shows. The yellow Gucci metallic skirt was the target for street style photographers during the FW16 season, and it was no surprise when metallics again were seen in Gucci’s pink-lit SS17 show.

The crushed-foil metallic look is a more subtle version of shine compared to sequins, beading, or satin. It clearly has roots in the holiday season, because of its resemblance to tinsel, and with fun colors the association is plain.

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Alexa Chung in a metallic jacket//Vogue

The most popular day of the year to wear metallics and sparkles is NYE, so when we wear the trend outside of that day, it evokes the feeling of celebrating the “new” and feeling adventurous and glamorous. For the past two years, or so, publications have been talking about “metallics for spring/summer,” but the public is bold enough to adopt now.

Obama US Italy

The look can be incorporated into footwear and beauty as well, which aides in the long term acceptance of the trend. Kylie Jenner’s cosmetic line has sparked the metallic beauty trend over the past year. Metallics are mostly worn by younger women, but can certainly be added to anyone’s ensemble. The crushed-foil look will surely spike during the holidays, and will plateau through the spring season this year.

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My Mood Board

Featured Image//Tumblr

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